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Urostomy Association

Support and information for people with, or considering, a urinary diversion

Support for you

Support for you

  • This photograph is of two women talking. It is the header image for the 'one to one support' page on the Urostomy Association's website

    One to one support

    Having a urinary diversion can be daunting, but our trained volunteers can provide reassuring, confidential one to one support, by telephone, face-to-face or through our branches and groups. All our volunteers are urostomates themselves, so can understand your concerns.

  • This is a photo of two people sitting in a cafe looking at a notebook. It is the header image for the FAQs page on the Urostomy Association's website.

    Frequently asked questions

    If you’re facing, or living with a urinary diversion, you’ve probably got lots of questions. Do check out our FAQs and see if we can help.

  • This is a photo of a woman looking at a laptop. It is the header image for the Urostomy Association's page on webinars.

    ‘Meet the experts’ webinars

    Whether you’re considering or already have a urinary diversion, you may have questions about how this might affect your life. We’ve been designing a series of webinars to explore some of the most common topics.

  • This is a photo of a string of people cut out of paper. It is the header image for the 'local support' page on the Urostomy Association's website.

    Local support

    In some areas of the UK, local groups offer mutual support and information. These groups have a range of in-person and online meetings.

  • This photo is of someone holding a mobile phone. It is the header image on the 'Helpline' page of the Urostomy Association's website

    Helpline

    It’s not unusual to feel anxious when you have, or are facing, a urinary diversion. And it isn’t always easy to talk to family and friends. But don’t worry, you can call our helpline for support, advice and help.

  • This photo is of a couple looking at the mobile phone. It is the header image of the Urostomy Association's web page describing its 'Urostomy Association Help and Support' Facebook group

    Facebook group

    Why not join our Urostomy Association Help and Support Group? It is a supportive community for people living with a urinary diversion or preparing for their surgery. Family members and carers will also find it a helpful.

  • This photograph is of 'The Journal', the Urostomy Association's magazine

    The Journal

    Packed with real life stories, advice, support, top tips and much more, The Journal is written exclusively for people living with, or facing, a urinary diversion. It is published three times a year and available digitally or through your door.

  • This photo is of a notepad with the word 'events' written on it. It is the header image for page on the Urostomy Association's website which describes the events which urostomates might like to attend

    Attend an event

    You may like getting together to share tips and experiences. Knowing that others understand what life is like with a urinary diversion can be empowering. On our events page you can see what’s being organised by our groups, branches, suppliers and others.

The urostomy blog

  • This is a photo of Lydia Makaroff, CEO of Fight Bladder Cancer. It is the header image for a guest blog on the Urostomy Association's website entitled 'Improving information and support for people with urostomies'

    Improving information and support for people with urostomies

    Research from Fight Bladder Cancer sheds light on significant gaps in patient education, particularly regarding the impact of urinary diversions on sexual health. In this guest blog, Dr Lydia Makaroff, shares some of the research findings.

  • This is a photograph of Linda Trill. She is author of the 'Cruising with a urostomy' blog on the Urostomy Association website.

    Cruising with a urostomy

    Linda had a cystectomy in October 2023. In her blog, Linda shares how she and her husband were determined to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary with a Rhine river cruise which involved a hotel stay, plane travel and eight nights on the boat. It was a packing challenge!

  • This is a photo of liquid that is a cloudy purple. It is the header image for the 'What is purple urinary bag syndrome' article on the Urostomy Association's website

    Purple urinary bag syndrome

    If you wake up one morning and find that the urine in your catheter or night drainage bag has suddenly turned purple it can be very alarming. In this blog, Katie Sainsbury explores the possible causes, treatments and preventions.

  • This is a photo of John Cunningham who, along with his wife Wendy, is undertaking the Land's End to John O-Groats challenge, despite having two stomas. It is the header image for his blog on the Urostomy Association website.

    Walk of hope and gratitude

    John Cunningham has not only a urostomy but a colostomy too. Now he and his wife, Wendy, are embarking on the Land’s End to John O’Groats challenge to show there can be life after cancer and that you can still achieve your goals, even living with two stomas.

  • This is a photo of a couple asleep in bed. It is the lead image for a blog entitled 'Managing night drainage: your questions answered'. It features on the Urostomy Association website

    Managing night drainage: your questions answered

    Getting a good night’s sleep is not always straightforward for people living with a urostomy due to the worry of leaks at night. In this blog, stoma care nurse Michaela Parker answers urostomates’ most frequently asked questions.

  • This a photograph of Brian Fretwell, Chair of the Urostomy Association. He is outside the House of Commons.

    Managing bladder cancer

    About 10,000 people are diagnosed with bladder cancer every year in the UK. In this blog, we explore the symptoms and explain the importance of getting the right information and treatment if you are diagnosed with the condition.

  • This photo is of Rebecca Giddings flying a plane. It is the header image for a blog post on the Urostomy Association's website.

    Wings and wheels

    Life took a dramatic downturn when Rebecca received multiple diagnoses in her early 30s. But 45 surgeries later, things are looking up – quite literally! Read Rebecca’s story of triumph over adversity and why the sky’s the limit now that she’s finding her ‘new normal’.

  • This is a photo of Donna Watson. It accompanies a blog on the Urostomy Association's website in which she shares her journey from needing lifesaving surgery to living life to its fullest, from kayaking to going on safari.

    Living life to its fullest

    With resilience in her DNA and support along the way, Donna went from needing lifesaving surgery to living life to its fullest, from kayaking to going on safari. As a UA volunteer, she’s using her experience to support others as they adapt to life wearing a bag.

  • This is a photo of Laura, and it is the header image of her blog on the Urostomy Association website in which she shares her story of life with two ostomies.

    Two bags for life

    Laura was given just two weeks to live following diagnosis of a rare, advanced bladder cancer. In this blog, she shares how the only option to save her life involved two ostomies: an ileal conduit (urostomy) and a colostomy, and what this means to her day to day life.

  • This is a photo of Jose Caeiro. It is the header image for a blog for urostomates, giving top tips for reducing leaks.

    Three simple steps to preventing leakage

    Jose Caeiro is a community Stoma Nurse in Cambridgeshire, working for Hollister. In this blog he gives three simple steps on how to prevent urostomy leakage – finding the right fit, achieving a secure seal and establishing a good skincare routine.

Latest news

Support our work

  • This is a photo of a person at sunset holding a bunch of balloons which make up a heart shape. It is the header image for the Urostomy Association's Help provide hope appeal page

    Help provide hope appeal

    Being told that you will never wee normally again is terrifying. Most people have never heard of a urinary diversion, and simply cannot imagine going through life without a functioning bladder. That’s why we’re running our Help provide hope appeal.

  • This is a photo of a group of people making heart shapes with their hands. It is the header image for the 'How your money helps' page on the Urostomy Association's website.

    How your money helps

    We are grateful for every gift we receive. Whether this be a first donation, regular monthly gift, a funeral collection, a gift in celebration, or following some fantastic fundraising. Please know we spend every penny with great care. See how your money helps…

  • This is a photograph of a bunch of forget me nots, shaped into a heart. It is the header image for the 'Remember someone special' page on the Urostomy Association's website

    Remember someone special

    We are always touched to receive in memory donations. Whether this is through a funeral collection or fundraising event, we will ensure your gift goes toward supporting urostomates and their loved ones, wherever they are on their personal journey.

  • This picture is of a pair of hands holding a heart symbol. It is the header image for the 'make a regular donation' page on the Urostomy Association website.

    Make a regular donation

    Regular, monthly donations are crucial because life with a urinary diversion can feel daunting. It’s vital that people have somewhere to turn for reassurance, from diagnosis to living life to the full again. We provide that support, but can only do so with kind donations.

  • This is a photo of a birthday cake, with candles being lit. It is the header image of a page on the Urostomy Association's website which encourages readers to donate in celebration.

    Giving in celebration

    Giving in celebration is an uplifting way to raise funds and make a real difference to the lives of people living with urinary diversions. By asking your loved ones to make a donation instead of giving presents, you can promote and support our ongoing work.

  • This photo is of a woman being advised on leaving a gift in her will to charity. It is the header image for the Urostomy Association's information page on leaving a gift in your will.

    Gifts in wills

    Since the Urostomy Association began in 1971 we’ve supported thousands of people living with a urinary diversion. Will you leave a gift in your Will, so we can continue provide reassurance to anxious people long into the future?

Friends and partners

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